Thursday, August 23, 2007

Breaks and Blogs

Confession time: my "annual unplugging" lasted only 10 days, but my break from blogging has been, well, significantly longer than that. Yes, it's true: I've been back in the land of the Internet-capable for 2 full weeks now, yet haven't blogged. I could say that I was busy getting caught up on work and social duties, but that would be a half-truth. The fact is, I was enjoying my blogging break.

Last night I attended the Geek Dinner organized by the supremely awesome Mr. Mitch Joel and was somewhat surprised to learn how many other dedicated bloggers felt the same way. Both Michael Seaton of The Client Side and Kathryn of That Kathryn Girl copped to also extending their vacays when it came to blogging.

And I say: good on them! Not just because knowing they felt the same way eased my own guilt, but because I think it's too easy to fall into the trap of "blog obligation", which can sap your creativity. If you need to take a break from blogging, so be it. Maybe you'll rediscover your love for the medium; maybe you'll find you don't miss it. Or maybe you'll discover, as one of my formerly-favorite bloggers posted for the final time: "I discovered I hate blogging."

4 comments:

Mitch Joel said...

Great post.

Here are my feelings on it:

Blog every minute. Blog when you feel like it.

Whatever works.

Isn't that the beauty of this? Your readers will work with you, because they know.

So whatever your style is... there's an audience for you :)

Kathryn said...

Agreed! Don't be beholden to the blog. I think we're seeing people put more value on really solid posts that inspire thought over blogging for the sake of hitting that 'publish now' button. I hope it continues.

Leona said...

For me, true-blue blogging is too much like what I get paid to do at work.

I'm in the process of migrating all my blogging activities to Tumblr which works so much better for me. (See leonahobbs.com)

That's the trick about this stuff, you've got to find what works for you and not hold yourself to someone else's standard. As Mitch said, "Whatever works."

Jenny Bullough said...

Thanks for your comments! I totally agree with all of you -- find what rhythm works for you yourself, and readers will accept it.